Cover of the Moab Happenings current month
 Moab Information
 Print Edition
 Attractions & Activities
 Health & Wellness
 Moab Services
 Museums
 SE Utah Parks
 Clubs and Organizations
 Moab Radios
 Current Calendar (Home)
 
Yearlong Event Calendar
 
Article Archive
 
Moab
Public Showers
 
 Arts in Moab
 Moab Art Walk
 Moab Arts Council
 Moab Arts Festival
 MARC  (Moab Arts &   Recreation Center)
 Moab Artist Studio Tour
 Moab Folk Festival
 Moab Music Festival
 Red Rock Arts Festival
 
 About Us
 Contact Us
 Moab Happenings Staff
 Subscribe
 Home

PET HAPPENINGS - May 2022

While camping or hiking in Utah, keep dogs on a leash so they don’t chase wildlife

With the weather getting warmer, many Utahns are starting to head outdoors. However, if you are planning to take your dog on any hikes or camping trips this spring and summer, make sure your pet doesn’t chase or harass any wildlife.

Utah wildlife often struggles to find food during the winter. By early spring, many animals are vulnerable and weak. Dogs that are off leash while in nature may act on their instincts to chase deer and other big game animals they see. However, that is harmful for the deer because by the end of winter, they are usually in survival mode.

“If they get chased, it uses up energy they may need to survive,” Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Big Game Coordinator Covy Jones said. “These animals are already depleted, and they often can’t afford to waste energy. If you or a pet force them to move away from where they are trying to feed, it could be harmful.”

Deer and other big game animals typically move to lower elevations in search of feed during the snowy winter months, which often brings them closer to roads and other populated urban areas where people and pets may be.

“National forests are some of the areas where people may encounter wildlife while recreating,” Dixie National Forest Public Affairs Officer Kevin Abel said. “While pets are allowed in all national forests, they must be kept on a leash no longer than 6 feet while in developed recreation areas (like campsites) and on established, interpretive trails. Most of the other areas within national forests do not require dogs to be on a leash, but they must be under the owner’s control at all times.”

While there are many other areas throughout the state where dogs aren’t required to stay on a leash, pet owners should not let their dogs chase deer, elk, moose or other wild animals. It can be harmful not only for the wildlife, but also can be dangerous for your pet.

“Wildlife is often unpredictable and may injure or kill a dog seen as threatening,” Jones said.
Dogs that are off leash can also disturb nesting ground birds and can chase, injure or kill small mammals, deer, elk or moose.

It is also in your best interest to not allow your pet to chase wildlife, because Utah law states that a person may kill or injure a dog that is “attacking, chasing or worrying any species of hoofed protected wildlife.”

“Pets allowed to run at large also are at risk from vehicles and predators,” Dave Whittekiend, forest supervisor for the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest said. “If you care about your pets, you should keep them secured while you are recreating outdoors.”

Here are some tips from Wild Aware Utah about keeping your dogs safe around wildlife:
• Keep your dog’s vaccinations up to date.
• Be aware that moose can be especially aggressive toward dogs.
• Always supervise pets when outdoors, particularly at dawn and dusk.
• Avoid going near den sites and thick vegetation.
• If you find an animal carcass, leave the area — it could be a kill that a cougar is guarding or will be returning to.
• Make noise while hiking.
• Do not allow dogs to “play with” or chase wildlife. It is against Utah law to allow dogs to chase or harass wildlife.
Media contact: DWR Public Information Officer Faith Heaton Jolley at 385-266-2640



Dog-Friendly Walks/Hikes
in the Moab Area

Corona Arch - Easy/Moderate. 1.3 Miles one way. Trailhead is 25 minute drive from Moab.
North on US-191 to Potash Road (Utah 279).

Mill Creek Pathway - Easy. 1.1 Miles. Little to no driving. Starts at the intersection of 100 South and 100 West,
a block off of Main Street.

Portal Overlook - Hard. 2.0 Miles one way. Trailhead is 20 minute drive from Moab.
North on US-191 to Potash Road (Utah 279).

Grandstaff Canyon - Moderate. 2.0 Miles one way. Trailhead is 10-minute drive from Moab.
North on US-191 to the River Road (Utah 128)

MoabBarkery website

Dog Friendly Walks/Hikes in the Moab Area
Trail or Walk Difficulty Length
(one way)
Proximity to Downtown
MillCreek Pathway
easy 1.1 miles Little to no driving
Starts at 100 S & 100 W
Portal Overlook
(trailhead @ Jaycee Park)
Hard 2.0 miles 25 min drive N on US-191 to W on Utah 279 (4.2 miles)
Moab Rim Hard 3.0 miles
(to Hidden Valley trail)
8 minute drive 2.6 miles down Kane Creek Blvd from US-191
Negro Bill Canyon
(aka William Grandstaff Canyon)
Moderate 2.0 miles 10 minute drive N on US-191 to
W on Utah 128, 3 miles
Hunter Canyon Easy 2.0 miles 25 minute drive (mild off-road)
7.5 miles down Kane Creek Blvd from US-191
Corona Arch Trail Easy/Moderate 1.5 miles 25 minute drive N on US-191 to
W Utah 279 (10 miles)
Hidden Valley
(trailhead at end of Angel Rock Rd)
Hard 2.0 miles 10 minute drive S on US-191
3 miles to Angel Rock Rd
Fisher Towers
(trailhead 2.2 miles off Utah 128)
Moderate 2.2 miles 35 minute drive N on US-191 to Utah 128, then 21 miles

Tips for enjoying your time with your dog here in the Moab area:

  • Bring lots of extra water for you and your dog.1 gallon per day for every 60lbs of dog!!
  • Don’t let dogs chase wildlife (especially coyotes, they can lead dogs into an ambush).
  • In the city, dogs are required to be leashed, but on public lands off leash with voice control is allowed.
  • Slickrock and sand is very abrasive!  Check paw pads often, or buy and use booties.
  • If it’s over 85 degrees only consider early AM or late PM hikes, daycare or leave your dog at home.
  • Pack out my poop!  Seriously or the other hikers without dogs will eventually demand no dogs allowed!

To see past articles about animals, pets and their care check our archives.

email Moab Happenings
© 2002-2022 Copyright Moab Happenings.  All rights reserved.
Reproduction of information contained in this site is expressly prohibited without the written permission of the publisher.