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PET HAPPENINGS March 2015

Live Better with your Pets!
by Jessica Turquette owner of Moab BARKery

We at the Moab BARKery know how much your pets can mean to you. You control everything in their world so you can enrich and greatly extend the life of your pet with a few simple measures. We wanted to give you the top 4 things we recommend that are easy and most effective to a vital, happy and health pet.

1. Keep your pet at an appropriate weight
This is the most effective way to ensure your pet can live as long as possible with the least amount of preventable disease. This also saves you money and is most kind to the planet (in the form of less waste!). There have been hundreds of studies about longevity in house pets, and the most common result is a slim pet lives an average of 2.2 years longer than an obese pet. Two more healthy years of your pet sounds like a pretty good deal to me! All of our personal pets have been overweight before, and we have to remind ourselves that they are small animals (all under 15lbs). So we cut treats in half, walked 10 minutes longer, cut 10% of their daily meals and helped them slowly (less than a 2% weight loss per week) work towards an ideal weight.

In order to know how much food to feed your pet, you must know their caloric needs. I recommend checking with your veterinarian on the proper weight for your pet and refer to the chart below.

Daily Calorie Requirements for Dogs

Body weight in lbs

Puppy up to 4 months

Puppy over 4 months

Neutered adult

Intact adult

Obese

Weight loss

4

 330

 220

 176

198

 154

 110

5

 390

260

 208

 234

 182

 130

6

 447

 298

 238

 268

 209

149

7

 501

 334

 267

301

 234

 167

8

 552

 368

 294

 331

 258

184

9

 603

 402

 322

 362

 281

 201

10

 654

 436

 349

392

 305

 218

11

702

468

374

 421

 328

234

12

750

 500

 400

 450

 350

 250

13

795

 530

 424

 477

371

265

14

 840

 560

 448

 504

 392

 280

15

 885

590

472

 531

 413

 295

16

930

 620

496

 558

 434

 310

17

972

 648

 518

 583

 454

 324

18

1017

 678

 542

610

475

339

19

 1059

 706

 565

635

 494

 353

20

 1098

732

 586

659

512

366

25

1299

 866

 693

779

 606

433

30

1491

 994

 795

 895

 696

497

35

1674

1116

 893

1004

781

 558

40

1848

1232

986

1109

862

 616

45

2019

1346

1077

1211

942

 673

50

 

1458

1166

1312

1021

 729

55

 

1566

 1253

 1409

1096

783

60

 

1670

 1336

1503

1169

 835

65

 

1774

1419

1597

1242

 887

70

 

 1876

 1501

1688

1313

938

75

 

 1976

 1581

1778

1383

988

80

 

 2074

 1659

 1867

1452

1037

85

 

2170

 1736

 1953

1519

1085

90

 

 2264

 1811

2038

1585

 1132

95

 

 2358

 1886

2122

1651

1179

100

 

 2450

1960

2205

1715

 1225

This graph provided by: http://www.animalmedicalcenterofchicago.com

2. Feed a species appropriate diet
Both cats and dogs benefit far more from a fresh, living diet that is moisture rich. This means offering something more than just a bowl of kibble. We recommend adding fresh meats and a small amount of vegetable to their daily diet. Fresh food is essential to happy healthy pets. We recommend things like pumpkin, lean meats like turkey or salmon, small amounts of omega rich oils (coconut or fish is good), green beans, flax seed, eggs, sweet potatoes, yogurt, apples, carrots and even oatmeal. Cats do better with mainly lean meats, omega rich oils and fresh foods that contain soluable fiber. All these ingredients offer something dry food just can’t, dietary enzymes and probiotics in their original state.

We also recommend that if you add these items into your pet’s diet, you introduce them slowly! First these items should be considered as a snack or treat and gradually working towards a larger part of their diet. The longer a pet has been without fresh food, the longer in can take to transition to it so be patient and go slow.

3. Exercise one extra hour each week
This means that if you do not exercise your pet at all you will be making a major change for the better. It is well known that things like metabolic problems improve greatly with exercise but it is also good for sore old stiff pets to gets those joints moving. Just make sure you consider the intensity of the exercise. If your pet is used to a daily walk, then make them a little longer (about 8 extra minutes a day should do). If your pet is used to playing in the yard, a short 15 minute walk 3 or 4 times a week will greatly improve their fitness (and yours too!). If you have an obese pet, senior or injured pet always consult with your vet for guidance about exercise. Some play can be fun and safe for sedentary pets. Just remember to go slow. We have a 16+ year old cat and we find that a little time chasing a wand with feathers a few minutes each night, and a walk around our property before breakfast (he will follow if I have his food in hand) keeps him less stiff and enriches his hunting instincts. His arthritis has improved with a small amount of daily activity. He doesn’t lay around long enough to get stiff anymore.

4. Add something daily for enrichment, bonding and wellness
If you take just one thing from this list each day and do it for your pet, you will have a much healthier and well adjusted pet.
• Brush their teeth with pet toothpaste (no fluoride!!)
• Training (try a new trick, or an old trick in a new environment)
• Drop by the vet, groomers, or pet wash/groomers for a quick visit
• Take your dog for a ride in the car (just a carefree ride, no errands)
• Walk your cat (of course you need a harness, patience and a safe place)
• Brush their fur, it helps distribute natural oils and increase circulation
• Stretch your pets (hip flexors, shoulder flexors, chest and back) – there are some great resources online for pictures. Pet yoga rocks!!
• Supplements (probiotics, omega oils, CoQ10, or glucosamine)
• Wash their feet and face, where all the bacteria and mess accumulates. A simple wipe down with a warm wash cloth can reduce allergens greatly.
• Trim a nail or two. This is often less stressful than the whole set at once.


MoabBARkery website

 

Dog Friendly Walks/Hikes in the Moab Area
Trail or Walk Difficulty Length
(one way)
Proximity to Downtown
MillCreek Pathway
easy 1.1 miles Little to no driving
Starts at 100 S & 100 W
Portal Overlook
(trailhead @ Jaycee Park)
Hard 2.0 miles 25 min drive N on US-191 to W on Utah 279 (4.2 miles)
Moab Rim Hard 3.0 miles
(to Hidden Valley trail)
8 minute drive 2.6 miles down Kane Creek Blvd from US-191
Negro Bill Canyon
(aka William Grandstaff Canyon)
Moderate 2.0 miles 10 minute drive N on US-191 to
W on Utah 128, 3 miles
Hunter Canyon Easy 2.0 miles 25 minute drive (mild off-road)
7.5 miles down Kane Creek Blvd from US-191
Corona Arch Trail Easy/Moderate 1.5 miles 25 minute drive N on US-191 to
W Utah 279 (10 miles)
Hidden Valley
(trailhead at end of Angel Rock Rd)
Hard 2.0 miles 10 minute drive S on US-191
3 miles to Angel Rock Rd
Fisher Towers
(trailhead 2.2 miles off Utah 128)
Moderate 2.2 miles 35 minute drive N on US-191 to Utah 128, then 21 miles

Tips for enjoying your time with your dog here in the Moab area:

  • Bring lots of extra water for you and your dog.1 gallon per day for every 60lbs of dog!!
  • Don’t let dogs chase wildlife (especially coyotes, they can lead dogs into an ambush).
  • In the city, dogs are required to be leashed, but on public lands off leash with voice control is allowed.
  • Slickrock and sand is very abrasive!  Check paw pads often, or buy and use booties.
  • If it’s over 85 degrees only consider early AM or late PM hikes, daycare or leave your dog at home.
  • Pack out my poop!  Seriously or the other hikers without dogs will eventually demand no dogs allowed!

To see past articles about animals, pets and their care check our archives.

 
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